Blog Comments

  1. speeder bike's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by DWPro
    Seeing how many servers are hosted on Pentium 3s and 4s, it shouldn't be that much of a problem for needs of stronger hardware.
    I have got a clunker in the basement that might able to run a server for RoR now, thanks for that comment, gave me an idea. Could we maybe use one of the website servers as a official MP server, since it doesnt demand much performance? I checked the CDNC overview and we are not on too much strain, and we even have a server down since August.
    Updated 1 Week Ago at 01:05 AM by speeder bike (gramatical)
  2. Hiradur's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by speeder bike
    Most of us cant afford to have high end rigs. That's why I think alot of people have left this game. For that money, most of us would get a car, I can even get a used 2001 Mercedes S500 for that money, that was $91,000 brand new.
    It will run better on any hardware while taking advantage of more powerful hardware (especially more cores).
    Fun fact: Today's GPUs have the same amount of FLOPS that the best super computer of 1998 had which cost millions and had a power usage of 850kW.
  3. DWPro's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Hiradur
    Didn't think of the potential to save traffic when using ZeroPoint physics. Good point. I think server hardware would still be an issue since the requirements would be higher and as such increase cost for hardware and electricity. This may reduce the count of available RoR servers but oh well...
    I agree that it should be done step by step, these are just my long-term goals.
    Seeing how many servers are hosted on Pentium 3s and 4s, it shouldn't be that much of a problem for needs of stronger hardware.
  4. speeder bike's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by 12444
    Rigs of Rods has aged like fine wine. Long live Rigs of Rods!
    You can even play it fine through Wine.
  5. speeder bike's Avatar
    Keep in mind most of us don't have $6000 gaming PCs and have high end CPUs and GPUs, heck, I have a APU that's getting along fine. Most of us cant afford to have high end rigs. That's why I think alot of people have left this game. For that money, most of us would get a car, I can even get a used 2001 Mercedes S500 for that money, that was $91,000 brand new.
    Updated 1 Week Ago at 07:57 PM by speeder bike
  6. Hiradur's Avatar
    Didn't think of the potential to save traffic when using ZeroPoint physics. Good point. I think server hardware would still be an issue since the requirements would be higher and as such increase cost for hardware and electricity. This may reduce the count of available RoR servers but oh well...
    I agree that it should be done step by step, these are just my long-term goals.
  7. firelover's Avatar
    Happy birthday for Rigs of Rods,i looking forward for next 10 years with it
  8. only_a_ptr's Avatar
    I agree for physics/rendering to be decoupled (as mentioned in forums), it's critical for accuracy and threading. Physics thread needs to run at constant rate, whereas rendering thread needs to have flexible framerate.
    The serverside physics may work:
    • hardware should not be an issue. The current physics code is uber-inefficient. After I'm done with it, I expect it to boost 150% or more, and I'm not exxagerating.
    • It can only work with ZeroPoint, though. Nodes must be stored in vehicle-local coords, because that way, server can update the vehicle's position at once, without updating individual nodes (that would kill networking). Individual nodes would only be updated if the vehicle deforms on server.

    However, further work on the server-physics should be delayed until RoR works perfectly as offline simulator. My ZeroPoint project should deal with phys/render decoupling for threading, but not networking. If we try to tackle too many ideas at once, we could easily get bogged down in coding, leaving RoR without a stable release for a long time.
  9. Hiradur's Avatar
    Thanks for the numbers. You have to keep in mind that calculating Pi is just iterating over one calculation pattern over and over again until you hit the desired accuracy. Whereas in RoR calculations are bigger and you got different calculations for different sections of a truck, making it more difficult to port it to OpenCL and increasing overhead for communication between CPU and GPU. That being said I still believe that OpenCL could speed up things. However after the physics core got overhauled I'd like to build in SSE support first. We need fast code for CPUs because OpenCL support should be toggleable due to the current situation of how it's supported. OpenCL is for later when its support is more settled.

    @MothBird: RoR is leaking memory and this will eventually get fixed but there is so much to work on right now that you got to be patient. About CUDA: I prefer OpenCL because it's not tied to a certain manufacturer. All components that RoR uses are cross-platform and not tied to specific hardware and I'd like to keep it that way.
  10. bubbleawsome's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Hiradur
    It is a nice idea. But OpenCL is a complex topic and from what I heard not easy to work with. You also got some limitation, e.g. doubles (if supported at all) slow down calculations significantly since GPUs are designed for 32 bit floats. I'm not experienced with this at all though and it's worth investigating but would also consume a lot of time.
    It would increase performance a lot if it ever got working. To give you an idea, my 4670k at 4.3Ghz working at all 4 cores took 17m 34s to calculate pi to 1B digits. My GPU took 42 seconds. In another bench the CPU took 12s and the GPU (using OpenCL again) took 0.7s.
    The problem comes with different cards. Double precision is locked down by manufacturers. My GPU is the 3 year old 7970 at 1100Mhz. Someone with the brand new 980 (twice as fast in games) clocked at 1250Mhz did what my GPU did in 42s in 38. That is a 4 second improvement, but it didn't halve the time like it should have. The 7850 took 1m 30s. My GPU's silicon (tahiti) has double precision (64-bit kinda) at 1/3. Maxwell has 1/16 or 1/32 I think. Professional cards usually have 1/2.

    An additional problem is using multiple cars. You wouldn't be able to split it onto cores, because the 7970 uses thousands of cores. You would need to figure out how to split it evenly per-car.

    All-in-all, it's great in theory, but maybe not in practice.
  11. MothBird's Avatar
    This all sounds good but what about the lack of CUDA support, giving nvidia gpu's a bit more of a fighting chance. What about the 32 bit architecture, we have so many problems based around memory usage, and the fact that the game can only use up to 3GB of ram.
  12. Lach Anonym's Avatar
    Yoohoo! Happy birthday!
  13. Hiradur's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by max98
    What about OpenCL? Using the GPU to calculate all these nodes would be a nice idea too.
    It is a nice idea. But OpenCL is a complex topic and from what I heard not easy to work with. You also got some limitation, e.g. doubles (if supported at all) slow down calculations significantly since GPUs are designed for 32 bit floats. I'm not experienced with this at all though and it's worth investigating but would also consume a lot of time.
  14. DirtGamer301's Avatar
    Yeees
    Since the new devs update RoR, Wheelie made a thread about RoRs future and Jeepster became moderator this, the forum, feels so much more alive! Also RoR itself!

    And RoRs 10th birthday is in March 2015
    http://www.rigsofrods.com/wiki/image.../RoR-cbase.pdf
    Updated 1 Week Ago at 04:28 PM by DirtGamer301
  15. max98's Avatar
    What about OpenCL? Using the GPU to calculate all these nodes would be a nice idea too.
  16. tatangjose's Avatar
    When is the actual birthday of ROR?
  17. NothingToDo's Avatar
    Yeah! Maybe some kind of birthday party?
  18. bubbleawsome's Avatar
    It's back! :')
  19. techguy2129's Avatar
    Yes, long live RoR!
  20. Erie_E8's Avatar
    Rigs of Rods has aged like fine wine. Long live Rigs of Rods!


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    Rigs of Rods is a unique soft body physics simulator.


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